Gujerati Export
Gujerati Export
Gujerati Export
Gujerati Export
Gujerati Export
Gujerati Export

SOLD

Gujerati Export
c 1700

Embroidered in Gujerat in Western India during the late 17th or early 18th century. This is the type of embroidery brought back to Great Britain by the East India Company. Patterns were sent from Britain to be copied in India, and in particular in Gujerat which produced much of the export trade embroidery. I have included it in this category because it was made for the Western market.  This piece is probably from the border of a bedhanging.  Bed curtains, valances, canopies and coverlets, chair covers and cushions were embroidered, usually by men, for the export Western market. In the Victoria and Albert museum they have sets of embroidered hangings similar to this with matching printed cotton chintz which could be used for covering walls. A hooked awl or ari  with twisted silks created very tight chain stitches on a piece of Indian natural twilled woven cotton. The effect is that the cloth has been painted. The contrasting bright clear colours with an elegant design is stunning.

Description

A border with a meandering design of seed pods and two different flowers between guard stripes, with small repeating flower heads, tendrils and leaves, the main ground with exotic curling and pointed leaves , seed pods and coiling stems with a variety of flowers and tendrils, all in bright clear yellow, aubergine, pink, mauve, mid blue and green and white twisted silks, on a fine twill weave natural cotton ground,

Length 3ft 2 in; 97 cm

Width 8 in; 20 cm

Five pieces.

Condition

From left to right. There is slight pink markings surrounding the maroon silks, so a little colour run. Very very very slight discolouration here and there. The colours are unfaded.

Comments

Interwoven Globe edited by Amelia Peck p 169

Email a friend

Close